7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark

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7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark

With its rich history, culture, and high standard of living, Denmark is a top destination for tourists and expats. Millions of tourists flock to the Scandinavian country each month, eager to explore its Viking past, among many other things. However, here are 7 things to know before going to Denmark.

There’s a lot to learn about Denmark. If you’re planning to visit the Nordic Kingdom anytime soon, here are seven things you should know before going:

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
Denmark is considered the third-most expensive Nordic country. Photo: Alexander Mils/Unsplash

1. Denmark is expensive
We’ve all heard about the free healthcare and thriving economy, but there’s another thing Scandinavian countries are known for – they’re expensive. Denmark is considered the third-most expensive Nordic country, after Norway and Iceland. It’s also the eighth most expensive country to live in in 2022.

The price shock can throw many people off when visiting Denmark, so it’s good to know upfront that you should expect it. You may notice the pricey-ness even before you enter the country when booking a hotel. Hotel prices are through the roof, which is why many people opt for Airbnb. Some other things people find pricey are transportation, dining out, and coffee.

Related: 8 Things To Know Before Moving To Denmark

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
In Denmark, there are winds year-round. Photo: Khamkeo Vilaysing

2. It’s very windy
Travelers know Denmark won’t be a sunny holiday like Italy or Spain. But many underestimate just how frequent and powerful the winds are in the Scandinavian country. There are winds year-round. Summer winds are warm, so you don’t have to worry about them too much. But if you go in the winter you should bring a good coat.

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
If you want to travel to the countryside or visit smaller towns, be prepared to carry some cash. Photo: Denmark’s National Bank

3. It’s good to have some cash at hand
If you plan to stay in Copenhagen or another large city, a credit card is all you need to make payments. But if you want to travel to the countryside or visit smaller towns, be prepared to carry some cash. In some places, you will have to use cash to pay for public transport and other necessities.

Related: 3 Best Denmark Travel Guides You Can Get For Free

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
Cyber threats are always a little more prevalent when traveling, no matter where you go. Photo: FLY D/Unsplash

4. Stay vigilant about cyber threats
It isn’t that Denmark is notorious for cybercrime. In fact, it’s quite the opposite, as it has very strict data protection laws. With that said, cyber threats are always a little more prevalent when traveling, no matter where you go.

The easiest way to stay safe while traveling is to use a VPN. This will allow you to use public wifi networks safely and prevent your devices from getting hacked. If you don’t have a subscription already, a VPN free trial may be all you need to get through your trip.

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
cycling is the best way to get around most cities in Denmark. Here from Copenhagen. Photo: Febiyan/Unsplash

5. The best way to get around is with a bike
Unless you’re making a cross-country trip, cycling is the best way to get around most cities in Denmark. The cycling infrastructure is in many ways better than the walking infrastructure, so cyclists often have priority over pedestrians. Bikes will also be quicker and cheaper than cars, so renting a car doesn’t make much sense.

Related: Top 10 Free Things To Do In Denmark

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
Christiania is a hippie commune in the central part of the city. Photo: Annie Spratt/Unsplash

6. Be careful when visiting Christiania
Christiania is a major tourist attraction in Copenhagen. It’s a hippie commune in the central part of the city. Many residents consider it separate from Denmark, and you will have to abide by some different rules while you’re there.

For one, there’s no filming. If someone notices your camera, there’s a good chance they’ll approach you and ask you to put it away. Taking photos is generally OK, but always ask for consent if other people are in your frame.

You also need to remember that Danish laws still apply to Christiania. Marijuana is still illegal; it’s just less likely to get caught due to lower police presence in the area.

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark
Denmark has a pant system where you can return used bottles for coins. Photo: Katrine Lunke/Infinitum

7. Don’t throw away used bottle
Denmark has a pant system where you can return used bottles for coins. Most supermarkets have pant machines, and you can use your returns as store credit. Most street trash cans also have a pant bin next to them. Leave your bottles there so that other people can return them to get some cash.

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark – Final thoughts
Denmark is a beautiful country, with a green countryside and many historic cities. It’s easy to see why tourism has been growing steadily for years.

With that said, Scandinavia is a bit different from more popular European destinations like Italy,

France, or Spain. Knowing the stuff in this list before you go to Denmark will help you have a better trip and return home with fond memories.

7 Things To Know Before Going to Denmark is a promotional article from Nord VPN.

Feature image (on top): Photo © Ava Coploff / Unsplash

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Journalist, PR and marketing consultant Tor Kjolberg has several degrees in marketing management. He started out as a marketing manager in Scandinavian companies and his last engagement before going solo was as director in one of Norway’s largest corporations. Tor realized early on that writing engaging stories was more efficient and far cheaper than paying for ads. He wrote hundreds of articles on products and services offered by the companies he worked for. Thus, he was attuned to the fact that storytelling was his passion.

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