Accessible Mountaineering in Norway

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To the north of Finse lie the Jotunheimen Mountains, literally the «Home of the Giants». Nonetheless, even the loftiest of the Jotunheimen peaks, Galdhøpiggen and Glittertind, which are the highest in Northern Europe, with summits rising more than 2,400 meters  (7,900ft), rank low on the international scale of noteworthy mountains where sheer altitude, nit challenge, is the main criterion.

Jostedalsbreen
Jostedalsbreen

Though this fact has led to relative anonymity – few Norwegian peaks appear in the classic mountaineering literature – it does mean that you can ascend the equivalent of the Matterhorn or Mont Blanc without the problems associated with high altitude.

The Lyngen Alps in northern Norway
The Lyngen Alps in northern Norway

Some of the glaciers that hewed the Norwegian landscape left offspring. Jostedalsbreen (Jostedal Glacier), is the largest in mainland Europe. Jostedalsbreen and its siblings throughout the coutry are the places to see crampon-shod parties wielding ice axes from spring until summer.

From Aurland
From Aurland

Contact with the ice that shaped our land is currently the Norwegians’ fastest growing wilderness recreation, and many centers now organize specialist courses.

Troll's tongue, Hardanger
Troll’s tongue, Hardanger

The most striking feature of outdoor recreation in Norway is its variety, people enjoy everything from a quiet stroll near home, to fishing, mountaineering and downhill skiing in winter. Such outdoor experiences may become memories of a lifetime.

Valdresflya
Valdresflya

Nine out of ten Norwegians go for a walk or take part in other forms of outdoor recreation about twice a week. Studies show that people first and foremost seek peace and quiet, and fresh air.

Accessible Mountaineering in Norway, written by Tor Kjolberg