At the Water’s Edge in Scandinavia

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Denmark and Sweden offer various coastlines and a thriving beach life. There are 8,000 km (5,000 miles) of coastline in Sweden, offering clean, if often chilly, water to swim in, and rocks to sun on (but few sandy beaches).

The most spectacular seascape is the Stockholm archipelago, with its 24,000 islands, bit nearly as thrilling are the waves crashing on the rocks of Bohuslan’s archipelago.

From Bohuslän, Sweden
From Bohuslän, Sweden

The Danes are blessed with sandy beaches. With more than 7,400km (4,600 miles) of coastline, the waters surrounding Denmark are a playground for outdoor activities. Kayaks, canoes, rowing boats and smaller sailing or motor craft may be hired at resorts along the coasts or on the larger lakes.

Klitmøller Beach, Denmark
Klitmøller Beach, Denmark

The air is hardly still in Denmark, and the windsurfing is excellent. Seasoned surfers may prefer the exhilaration of the North Sea, for example the beaches around Klitmøller; while beginners can try their hand in the lee of a bay or fjord, or on a lake.

From Hardanger fjord, Norway
From Hardanger fjord, Norway

Norway’s fjords can be explored by steamers summertime. In winter when the fjords freeze over, families take Sunday “walks” in skates among the rocks and islets. Norway has the next longest coastline in the world (83,281km) after Canada (202,080km).

At the Water’s Edge in Scandinavia, written by Tor Kjolberg