From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse

0
133
From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse

The transformation of an old boathouse in Vikebygd, a small village on the Norwegian west coast, is a collaboration between Oslo-based studios Koreo Arkitekter and Kolab Arkitekter.

A boathouse, (in Norwegian «naust»), is a common landmark along the Norwegian coast. Traditionally built as a place for storage of boats and fishing equipment, the naust used to be functional buildings with simple materials. Today, as dependence on the sea and fishing industry is declining, many of them are being transformed for leisure purposes and now by day NAUST V looks entirely wooden but becomes a glowing beacon by night.

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse
NAUST V looks entirely wooden but becomes a glowing beacon by night

Related: Tailormade House for Retired Couple in Norway

The right to roam in Norway
As the Norwegian coastline is considered common property, regulations are very conservative regarding size, use and appearance. Hence, the dichotomy between the regulations and new Norwegian leisure culture forces an old typology to take a new form.

The structure of NAUST V has the same simple profile as before, with a symmetrical pitched roof and large waterfront doors. But it is now almost twice as long, with a new facade that combines pine slats and sections of translucent polycarbonate plastic.

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse
The structure of NAUST V has the same simple profile as before, with a symmetrical pitched roof and large waterfront doors

Related: The Exciting Story of a Norwegian House Manufacturer

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse
At the back of the naust, one step above the ground floor, lies a stone terrace surrounded by a small forest. The new naust is extended backwards to include this terrace into a new winter garden. This part is covered by angled wood cladding, which makes it both opaque and transparent.

In the transition a kitchen and a fireplace is introduced as a central gathering space. Sitting alcoves and shelves are integrated in two of the walls, providing a flexible floor area. A big opening in the western wall creates a transition between the interior and stone terrace on the west side.

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse
. Sitting alcoves and shelves are integrated in two of the walls, providing a flexible floor area

In the eastern wall, a horizontal window offers a glimpse of the village and the surrounding mountains. At daytime the naust is subordinated to the local traditions at distance, whilst unveiling unexpected qualities when given a closer look. The main materials used in the project are locally produced pine, plywood, and polycarbonate sheets.

Related: Villa Saunders in Bergen

Both Opaque and transparent
“Angled wood cladding makes it both opaque and transparent,” said the team. “In daytime the naust is subordinated to the local traditions [when viewed from] a distance, but unveils unexpected qualities when given a closer look.”

Koreografi (norwegian) is the art or practice of drawing sequences of movements in space. The word derives from the greek khoreia which means “dance in group” and graphein which means “writing”.

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse
NAUST V is now almost twice as long, with a new facade that combines pine slats and sections of translucent polycarbonate plastic

Koreo is the common project of the French and Norwegian architects Agathe Monnet and Erlend Aalmo Strønstad. On a daily basis they practice full-time at two established offices in Oslo. Due to their profound interest for architecture, they have established Koreo as a parallel practice to develop both built and theoretical projects together with dedicated collaborators.

NAUST V, built: 2015.

Project credits:

Architects: Koreo Arkitekter and Kolab Arkitekter
Team: Agathe Monnet, Erlend Aalmo Strønstad, Anna Andrea Vik Aniksdal, Sindre Wam
Carpenter: Byggmester Lauritz Bjørnevik
Subcontractors: Skartland Trevirke, Håland & Karlson, Vink Norway, Eiva Safex, Haugaland Mur og Fasade, Spanne Blikk

From Old Norwegian Boathouse to Glowing Wooden Summerhouse, text provided by the architects

All photos by Mattias Josefsson

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here