Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia

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Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia

A recent study of the outdoor adventures of pet cats in Norway has revealed that, while the majority spend their time close to home, some cats travel several kilometers once they are outside.  Learn more about getting out and about with pets in Scandinavia.

With 770,000 domestic cats in Norway alone, cats are the most popular pets in Scandinavia. Cats can be fiercely independent and spend over three quarters of their time away from home, but there are many opportunities for cat lovers to spend quality time with them in the numerous cat cafes found in cities throughout the region.

There are also plenty of pet-friendly establishments that will welcome dog owners when they’re out and about with their furry friends. While short outings with pets can be enjoyable experiences, longer journeys involving travel abroad or moving house may be more difficult. However, by taking the time to plan trips carefully and adhering to entry requirements and regulations of each individual country, the potential stress of traveling with pets can be minimized.

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia
Moving home is an exciting prospect, but it can also be stressful for both humans and animals.

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Read also: Pet Friendly Norway – A Guide to Oslo’s Best Dog-Friendly Dining Hot Spots
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Relocating With Pets

The pet travel market has grown significantly in recent years, but moving animals to a new home is certainly not a new phenomenon. Archaeologists in Britain have recently found evidence that the Vikings took animals with them when they originally traveled from Scandinavia over a thousand years ago. Bones of dogs and horses have been discovered in Viking burial mounds alongside humans, signifying the animals were considered as household pets rather than just farm animals.

These days, although moving home is an exciting prospect, it can also be stressful for both humans and animals. Booking a boarding kennel or cattery for the day of the move, investing in a comfortable carrier for the journey, and ensuring pets are immunized and microchipped can all help to ensure that a house move with a pet runs smoothly.

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia
The pet travel market has grown significantly in recent years

Traveling Abroad with Animals

A record of vaccinations is also important for any foreign travel within Scandinavia. When arriving at the airport, pets will need proof of protection against rabies, be identifiable with a microchip or an inked tattoo, and have a valid pet passport. However, travelers are also advised to check the entry requirements of individual Scandinavian countries as these may differ. For example, dogs traveling from Sweden to Finland require treatment against the parasitic disease echinococcosis at least 24 hours before their arrival back in the country.

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia
The Scandinavian culture places a high value on outdoor activities. Photo: Camden Olson,
Princeton university
class of 2018

Days Out with Dogs

The Scandinavian culture places a high value on outdoor activities, nature and an active lifestyle, and dogs often fit seamlessly into this lifestyle. With a reputation for being animal-friendly and having strong welfare laws, Scandinavia provides a positive environment for pet ownership and dogs are frequently seen accompanying their owners on walks, hikes and outdoor adventures. In Sweden, there are numerous restaurants, hotels, and campsites that welcome travelers with their dogs and dogs on a leash are allowed in most city and national parks. Getting around the country is relatively simple too.  While it is necessary to reserve a seat in a special pets allowed section on long distance trains, generally, dogs travel free on local public transport in Sweden’s major cities.

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia
Travelers enjoying a visit to a cat cafe will all receive a pet-friendly welcome in Scandinavia.

Meeting Cats in Cafes 

While there is plenty of information about the benefits of owning a pet, research from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences uncovered how pet ownership also makes a significant contribution to the economy.  Meeting the needs of animals and their owners through the use of veterinary and grooming services, training and doggie daycare creates economic activity in the form of employment, income and tax revenue.  As well as allowing animal lovers to spend time with their pets or meet new furry friends, small businesses such as dog-friendly restaurants in Norway or one of the popular cat cafes in Sweden and Finland also boost economic growth.  Enjoying a coffee or paying a small fee helps to cover the cost of care for the cats and supports future rescue and adoption efforts.

With a little preparation, traveling with pets or enjoying a day out with animals doesn’t need to be stressful. In fact, locals on a hike with their dog, families relocating with their pet or tourists enjoying a visit to a cat cafe will all receive a pet-friendly welcome in Scandinavia.

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia
Karoline Gore

Getting Out and About with Pets in Scandinavia, written dedicatedly for Daily Scandinavian by Karoline Gore. Karoline is a freelance writer from Stoke on Trent in the UK who left the corporate grind when she started a family and has never looked back. She enjoys contributing to a range of online publications on the topics that are important to her.

Feature image (on top): © Unsplash

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Journalist, PR and marketing consultant Tor Kjolberg has several degrees in marketing management. He started out as a marketing manager in Scandinavian companies and his last engagement before going solo was as director in one of Norway’s largest corporations. Tor realized early on that writing engaging stories was more efficient and far cheaper than paying for ads. He wrote hundreds of articles on products and services offered by the companies he worked for. Thus, he was attuned to the fact that storytelling was his passion.

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