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Scandinavian Painters in Paris

Henri Matisse, the “Wild man” of the avantgarde and possibly the greatest modern art innovator of the 20th century, is world famous. Less known is perhaps that Matisse taught students for three years between January 1908 and 1911. Many of these were from Sweden and Norway. Learn more about these Scandinavian painters in Paris. The most famous Norwegian painters at the Academie Matisse were Henrik Sørensen, Jean Heiberg, Axel Revold and Per Krohg.  Probably a total of almost 30 Scandinavian artists were students at the academy during this three-year period.
Scandinavian Painters in Paris
Portrait of Henri Matisse by Carl Van Vechten, 1933
The teachings of Matisse consisted of still life, croquis and act painting, and the correction from French teacher was consistently radical. Value painting was to give way to flat color painting. Warm and cold color surfaces, usually strong and unrealistic, were juxtaposed and often framed by a marked contour line. All Scandinavian students had different experiences, at different periods of their careers, and in turn with different standings today within the canon of modern art; Isaac Grünewald, an 18-year-old prodigy and favorite of Matisse, Mollie Faustman, a young female artist, who would go on to be a founding member of the Association of Swedish Artists, creating equal opportunities for women in art, and Alf Lundeby, a 40-year-old artist at the time of entering the Académie and already well established within Norway, whose palette and technique would be permanently changed by his experience in Paris. Among the Norwegian Matisse students, Per Krogh was the painter with the closest connection to the French capital. The fact that as a young man he was recognized as a tango dancer on stages in several Nordic capitals further contributed to the impression of a gentleman out of the ordinary. It is also no secret that the young Krogh was so skilled at drawing that even as a child he illustrated his painter father Christian Krogh‘s articles in Kristiania’s (now Oslo’s) most respected newspapers.
Scandinavian Painters in Paris
Alf Lundeby (1870 – 1961), Study of a nude, 1910, Oil on canvas, 65 x 44 cm. (25 5/8 x 17 3/8 in.)
In Paris, Matisse corrected two to three times a month, during which everyone stood around to receive their “final verdict”. Most was technically permissible, but not all innovations benefitted the overall impression. The painterly result never became completely abstract but gained an expressive character that initially attracted attention and criticism. Henri Matisse had originally moved to Paris to study law and it was through the Académie Libere system that he developed as an artist. The Académie Julian was the first to be established, in 1868 (particularly important to female painters, who were not accepted to France’s Académie des beaux Artes until 1897). Matisse was admitted as a student in 1891, where he was taught by Gustave Moreau. From here he moved on to the Académie Carière, where he met André Derain and in turn Maurice de Vlamink, two strong influences on his work. It wasn’t until 1904, with the support and foresight of the dealer Ambrose Vollard, that Matisse had his first solo show. Then the famous Salon d’Automne in 1905, where Matisse became the figurehead of a group that would be dubbed  ‘les fauves’ (wild beasts).
Scandinavian Painters in Paris
Richard Bergh (1858 – 1919), The Council of the Society of Artists (Christian Eriksson, Robert Thegerstrom, Nils Kreuger, Karl Nordstrom, Richard Bergh and Eugéne Jansson), 1903, Oil on canvas, 150 x 212 cm. (59 x 83.4 in.), Photographer Asa Lundén, Nationalmuseum Sweden
“In Norway, Per Krogh was convincing as the elegant, modern city person. In the French environment, his sailor’s waltzes on the accordion were slightly exotic, and the drooping side braid, which in Kristiania was considered extremely phat, was in Paris considered as a real typical Viking hairstyle,” explains art historian Trygve Nergaard in his book “Bilder av Per Krogh» (Pictures of Per Krogh). Henrik Sørensen received enormous attention for his painting “Svartbekken”, which was to be called the world’s first expressionist painting by art critic Roger Fry. This was the prelude, the “Matissians” or the “Parisians” as they were called, and marked the modernist breakthrough in Norway.
Scandinavian Painters in Paris
The Shadow’ by Per Krogh
It was Matisse’s critiques that were the most daunting for his students, and he is recorded as being stern and limited with his praise. In 1908 Matisse published his article, Notes d’un peintre, where he articulated his seeming contradiction between freedom and tradition within his artistic practice and explained that his plea for a pursuit of expression, l’expression, could be misinterpreted as a plea for complete freedom in artistic expressions. It was his ability to articulate his artistic ideas so eruditely that would be so influential on his students, even over a short time, opening the eyes of so many. His article  spread within Nordic circles and along with those first artists that had started at the foundation of the academy, in particular Swedish Carl Palme, who enticed many to join the Académie’s ranks. Scandinavian Painters in Paris, written by Tor Kjolberg Feature image (on top): Painting by Per Krogh in Town Hall, Oslo.

Denmark – the Most Thriving Country in Europe

Gallup’s global wellbeing metrics are the first comprehensive measure of the behavioral economics of gross national wellbeing, which lays the foundation for all other measures of a country’s economic strength. With ongoing research projects in more than 150 countries, Gallup is a leader in the collection and analysis of global data and measurements. According to the metrics, Denmark is the most thriving country in Europe. Gallup asks ordinary individuals for their thoughts and opinions on several topics, including economics, religion, migration, and wellbeing. Gallup’s data provide sound evidence on many issues that more than 98% of the world’s adult population faces. The report says that 82% of Danish adults rated their lives highly enough to be  ‘thriving’, while only 17% said they were struggling and only 1% suffering. You can download the report here. Thriving in Copenhagen In the past 30 years, the country’s capital Copenhagen has undergone a great transformation. From an ageing, indebted city with fleeing industries and inhabitants, it has become one of the happiest cities in the world according to different city rankings. Copenhagen has based its resilience on a dynamic economy and a green and inclusive urban environment for its inhabitants. This has materialized through a comprehensive urban development strategy. The city has launched the revitalization of several declining neighborhoods over the course of decades with the objective of building a liveable city with ambitious economic, social and environmental objectives that offers every citizen a homogenous urban and social fabric. The aim of Copenhagen is to make the city liveable, so all aspects of citizens’ lives are taken into consideration in an inclusive strategy of urban planning, making cities and inhabitants more resilient to shock and stresses.
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
Home of Carlsberg is just a taster of Copenhagen’s newest attractions.
What has happened in Copenhagen the last 12 months? Well, unfortunately the capital lost one of its oldest landmarks when Renaissance-era stock-exchange building Børsen burned down in April. However, it will be painstakingly rebuilt. Home of Carlsberg is just a taster of Copenhagen’s newest attractions. Technically, this experience opened at the end of 2023, but it’s so good it’s worth mentioning in this review. Experience the full history of this iconic brand in the original brewery of Carlsberg, the best beer in the world. Probably?
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
This year, the Danish capital will open five new Metro stations. Photo: Peter Sørensen
Thriving construction projects have been part of Copenhagen’s wellbeing philosophy for the past three decades This year, the Danish capital will open five new Metro stations and make the growing residential zones even more liveable.
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
Late last year, Copenhagen opened the new Opera Park beside the Royal Danish Opera House.
By 2050, the population of Copenhagen is expected to have grown by a further 100,000 people to approx. 750,000. The growth will primarily be seen in the new districts and especially along the waterfront, according to forecasts from the City of Copenhagen. Late last year, Copenhagen opened the new Opera Park beside the Royal Danish Opera House. The Opera Park is a public park on the Copenhagen harbor front designed for recreation, relaxation and contemplation in the middle of the dense city center. A green lung offering a diverse variation of trees, bushes, plants and flowers. Designed by Cove Architects, it is organized with inspiration from the European capitals’ historical gardens with winding paths and carefully crafted viewpoints, The Opera Park consists of six gardens from various parts of the world, a café and greenhouse, underground parking garage for up to 300 cars as well as a covered pedestrian bridge connecting the park with the neighboring Royal Danish Opera. The park will open 27th of October
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
today, Århusgadekvarteret is seen as a district in its own right.
In 2015, the first residents moved into the newly established Århusgadekvarteret, which today is seen as a district in its own right. About 2,800 people now live there, and the first of many eateries, supermarkets and specialty shops have also opened. In 2020, the Copenhagen Metro opened two stations.
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
The artificial island of Lynetteholm. Photo: Cowi Architects
The second phase of Copenhagen’s DKK20bn expansion onto the artificial island of Lynetteholm began late last year. Lynetteholm will be built by development company By & Havn (City & Port) using soil from construction projects in Copenhagen and the surrounding area. Nordhavn’s long history as an industrial port is evident throughout the new development. Old buildings and features have been preserved, and many of the new buildings and projects are inspired by the area’s historical past.
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
Nordhavn’s long history as an industrial port is evident throughout the new development. Photo: Visit Copenhagen
“Nordhavn exudes maritime industrial history. And this special atmosphere is being maintained and integrated into the district by preserving selected buildings and cultural-historical features. New materials and fixtures are chosen to tie in with the original character of the port. In other words, robust materials such as concrete surfaces, cast iron, cobblestones, COR-TEN weathering steel and hardwood that can all withstand the coastal climate, while patinating beautifully and meeting the functional requirements,” says Kristian Wederkinck Olesen, Communications Manager at By & Havn.
Denmark - the Most Thriving Country in Europe
Denmark’s first dedicated children’s hospital is under construction. Photo: 3XN Architects
Denmark’s first dedicated children’s hospital is under construction. ‘Life must be lived – even during serious illness.’ This is the premise for Denmark’s new children’s hospital, Mary Elizabeth’s Hospital, named after HM Queen Mary. In a new partnership between the hospital’s foundation, Børneriget Fonden, idverde, Malmos Landskaber, and Juul Frost Architects, this special test project that will lead to “Mary’s Magical Roof Garden” on top of the new children’s hospital towards Nørre Allé. The children’s hospital is scheduled for completion in 2026 and is a big investment in families by a city that’s already well known for its human generosity. Denmark – the Most Thriving Country in Europe, compiled by Tor Kjolberg

Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World

The annual Global Wealth Report published by Swiss private bank UBS has found that adults in the Scandinavian kingdom have the 6th highest mean and median wealth in the world. Internationally, global wealth has declined for the first time since 2008. Denmark is reported the 6th wealthiest country in the world. The annual UBS Global Wealth Report 2024, published in partnership with Credit Suisse for the first time since the two banks merged 1st July 2024, looks at wealth statistics from the world’s major economies in 2023. With its report, the bank aims to provide “the most comprehensive available information on global household wealth,” defining “wealth” as “the value of financial assets plus real assets (principally housing) owned by households, minus their debts.”
Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World
UBS entrance, Paradeplatz. Photo: Wikipedia
This includes assets like savings, insurance, bonds, stocks, and pensions. UBS calculates the total value of all of these financial assets for each country and divides the overall figure by the country’s population to determine the average wealth of citizens in US dollars. According to these criteria, the 2024 report found Switzerland to be the wealthiest nation on Earth, with adults in the alpine nation owning a mean of 709.612 dollars in 2023. Luxembourg and Hong Kong followed, where the adult population respectively held 607,524 and 582,000 dollars worth of wealth each last year. ************************************************** Related: The State of Denmark 2024 *************************************************
Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World
Some of these findings on individual wealth will come as no surprise to most readers, but others may well be highly unexpected.

Wealth disparity is very pronounced, the study stresses

“Western Europe is a mosaic of wealth growth, not a unit. Wildly different outcomes in individual wealth growth are not limited to countries in different continents and at different stages of economic development, however. Even within Western Europe, the evolution of wealth growth could hardly be more diverse. Indeed, by this measure, the continent is more of a mosaic than a unit, which is all the more remarkable given that Western European countries already shared mature and developed economies in 2008 and in most cases were even part of the same trade bloc. Europe’s sovereign debt crisis is one reason for these widely different trajectories in wealth growth,” the report reads. The rise in wealth that went unnoticed Some of these findings on individual wealth will come as no surprise to most readers, but others may well be highly unexpected. Many people may not recognize their own country. They may feel like the reported growth or decline in wealth has passed them by without them noticing. There is a good reason for this, namely the difference between average and median wealth. In most markets in the report’s sample, average wealth in 2023 is significantly higher than median wealth per adult. The former exceeds the latter by a factor of four in Switzerland, by more than a factor of two in France and Mexico, almost three in Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR and Taiwan and by a factor of five in the United States, Brazil and the United Arab Emirates.
Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World
Since 2008, inequality in North America has slightly decreased, while it has gone up in Latin America as well as most of Eastern Europe and Asia. Photo: Piggybank/Unsplash
******************************** Related: Six Explanations Why Nordic Countries Rank High on Happiness and Finance Indexes ********************** Inequality since 2008 – an unequal picture Equality, or the lack of it, is a prominent topic of discussions about wealth. Since 2008, inequality in North America has slightly decreased, while it has gone up in Latin America as well as most of Eastern Europe and Asia, with the notable exceptions of South Korea and Hong Kong SAR. Inequality is measured with the help of the Gini coefficient, a number between zero and 100. A reading of zero means exact equality, i.e., a scenario where everybody owns exactly the same amount of wealth, while a reading of 100 means that one individual owns all of the assets and everybody else owns zero, i.e., absolute inequality Sweden has increased its inequality by 1.3% since 2008, while this figure for Denmark is 11.3%.
Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World
Looking ahead, the report expects wealth per adult to keep growing in almost all markets of the sample.
Number of USD Millionaires – Current and Forecast Looking ahead, the report expects wealth per adult to keep growing in almost all markets of the sample. The report further forecasts emerging markets’ share of global wealth to break through the 30% barrier in 2024. In some markets, the number of USD millionaires will increase by up to 50% over the next five years, according to estimates. Sweden is expected to grow its number of USD Millionaires from 575,426 in 2023 to 703,216 in 2028, an increase of 22%. Norway is expected to grow its numbers of millionaires by 22%, from 253,085 to 308,247. UBS report: The 10 wealthiest countries in the world
  1. Switzerland (709,612)
  2. Luxembourg (607 524)
  3. Hong Kong (582 000)
  4. United States (564 862)
  5. Australia (546 184)
  6. Denmark (448 802)
  7. New Zealand (408 231)
  8. Singapore (397 708)
  9. Norway (382 575)
  1. Canada (.375 800)
For more information about the study, and to see how other nations faired, check out UBS’ website. Denmark is Reported the 6th Wealthiest Country in the World, compiled by Tor Kjolberg

Swedish Grandparents Get Paid to Take Care of Grandkids

Sweden’s generous social services systems now allows parents to transfer a portion of paid leave days to their grandparents. So, Swedish grandparents get paid to take care of grandkids. Since July 1, Swedish parents can each give 45 days of parental leave to a third party, who will be compensated for looking after the child, a system designed to assist families’ organization. The development comes after the Swedish parliament, the 349-seat Riksdag, approved last December the government’s proposal on transfer of parental allowance. This comes 50 years after the Scandinavian country became the first in the world to introduce paid parental leave for fathers and not just mothers.
Swedish Grandparents Get Paid to Take Care of Grandkids
Since July 1, Swedish parents can each give 45 days of parental leave to a third party. Photo: NHI.no
*************************************** Related: Nordic Healthcare: Why Scandinavians are so Healthy *************************************** This is not Sweden’s first foray into groundbreaking social services. Swedish citizens pay some of the world’s highest taxes, but in return receive state-financed health care, free education up through college and generous unemployment benefits. Under the current system, Swedish parents are entitled to 480 days of paid parental leave – whether shared between two parents, or all for a single parent. For 390 days, the compensation is set at around 80% of the parent’s income. For the remaining 90 days, it is capped at a basic level of 180 kronor (€16) per day. These leave days must be taken before the child turns 12. During the child’s first 15 months, the parents can stay home together for 60 days; 90 of the 480 days are reserved for each of them.
Swedish Grandparents Get Paid to Take Care of Grandkids
Swedish citizens pay some of the world’s highest taxes, but in return receive state-financed health care and more. Photo: NHI.no
There are also other benefits for parents in Sweden — they can also work reduced hours until the child is 8 years old, while government employees can get those reduced hours until the child turns 12. According to New York Times, Sweden’s guidelines are in sharp contrast to the United States, which is one of only a handful of Western countries that does not guarantee any paid maternity or parental leave. ***************************************** Related: Scandinavian Work-Life Balance: How It Influences Employee Productivity ***************************************** Though parental leave policies in countries like Sweden are seen as the “gold standard,” around the world, such generosity is “not realistic for the United States” because of resistance to higher levels of taxation, said Richard Petts, a professor of sociology at Ball State University and an expert on parental leave.
Swedish Grandparents Get Paid to Take Care of Grandkids
There are also other benefits for parents in Sweden — they can also work reduced hours until the child is 8 years old. Photo: Besteforeldreaksjonen
According to the latest report from Sweden’s Social Insurance Agency (Försäkringskassan), published in mid-June, for children born in 2021, fathers took 27% of the leave, or 130 days – a 7-point increase over 10 years. For several years now, however, the debate has focused more on the advisability of extending parental leave compensation to other beneficiaries than on gender equality, partly to ease the burden on single mothers. Swedish Grandparents Get Paid to Take Care of Grandkids, written by Tor Kjolberg

Photographer from Greenland Has Taken Over Denmark’s Pavilion at This Year’s Venice Biennale

Photographer Inuuteq Storch of Greenland is demonstrating the knotty relationship between the two countries. The photographer from Greenland has taken over Denmark’s pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale. Storch shares some of his visual explorations of his homeland, Greenland, or rather: Kalaallit Nunaat. Storch connects individual stories within a larger, personal exploration of Greenlandic identity, history, and everyday life. His photographs — from Nuuk, Qaanaaq, Sisimiut, and abroad — convey a raw, poetic, and playful sense of community while also delving into spiritual connections with nature and ancestry. ********************************** You may also like to read: The Father of Eskimology **********************************
Photographer from Greenland Has Taken Over Denmark’s Pavilion at This Year’s Venice Biennale
Inuuteq Storch from the series Keepers of the Ocean (2019)© THE ARTIST
Inuuteq Storch  is the first Kalaaleq artist to present a major exhibition in the Danish Pavilion. Storch is also the youngest artist ever to represent Denmark in Venice and the first photographer to do so. Nevertheless, his approach to the exhibition is deeply marked by notions of photographic legacy, turning to family albums, archives, histories of Kalaallit photographers and intimate snapshots of everyday life to explore how photography has shaped both personal and national identity in Kalaallit Nunaat.
Photographer from Greenland Has Taken Over Denmark’s Pavilion at This Year’s Venice Biennale
Portrait of Inuuteq Storch© THE ARTIST
Photographer from Greenland Has Taken Over Denmark’s Pavilion at This Year’s Venice Biennale
Inuuteq Storch from the series Soon Will Summer be Over (2023)© THE ARTIST
Take a break in one of the hammocks behind the pavilion to admire an unexpected recreation of the breathtaking view from Storch’s house. The Venice Biennale runs through 24. November. Photographer from Greenland Has Taken Over Denmark’s Pavilion at This Year’s Venice Biennale, written by Tor Kjolberg. Feature image (on top): From the series Porcelain Souls © Inuuteq Storch. All images courtesy the artist.

Dine for Free in Copenhagen

Tourists participating in certain green initiatives may even dine for free in Copenhagen this year. While several European cities are exploring innovative ways to manage the influx of visitors, the Danish capital, Copenhagen, has initiated a new initiative through which the city will reward tourists who take part in climate-friendly tasks. Through 11 August 2024, the “CopenPay” initiative rewards eco-friendly tourists with free meals, drinks, and activity vouchers.
Dine for Free in Copenhagen
“We must turn tourism from being an environmental burden into a force for positive change,” said Mikkel Aarø-Hansen, the chief executive of Wonderful Copenhagen.
“We must turn tourism from being an environmental burden into a force for positive change,” said Mikkel Aarø-Hansen, the chief executive of Wonderful Copenhagen, the tourism organization for the Capital Region of Denmark. An important step in this transformation, he said, “is to change how we move around on the destination, what we consume, and how we interact with the locals.” *************************** Related: Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen *************************** “All our choices have an environmental impact, so why not make conscious decisions that benefit us all and be rewarded for them?” he added.
Dine for Free in Copenhagen
“One of the things we can change is getting people to act more sustainably at the destination,” says Rikke Holm Petersen, communications chief for Copenhagen’s Tourist Board.
Rikke Holm Petersen, communications chief for Copenhagen’s Tourist Board, explained: “When you travel abroad – if you fly to other places or you travel by car – you pollute. One of the things we can change is getting people to act more sustainably at the destination.”
Dine for Free in Copenhagen
Through 11 August 2024, the “CopenPay” initiative rewards eco-friendly tourists with free meals, drinks, and activity voucher.
On average, 81 percent of consumers say they want to act more sustainably, but only 22 percent have changed their behavior, according to a 2023 sustainable report by Kanter, a London-based market research group. Copenhagen’s new initiative, CopenPay, aims to bridge the gap between the desire to act sustainably and actual behavior by making climate-friendly action a currency for cultural experiences. The Tourism Office of Copenhagen claims that “based on the evaluation, we hope to reintroduce CopenPay as a year-round, green payment experience within the economy and broaden the concept to other parts of Denmark and the rest of the world.” The trust-based pilot program involves 24 local organizations offering rewards such as complimentary meals, drinks, and activity vouchers. No government funding is involved.
Dine for Free in Copenhagen
Those who arrive by bike or train at CopenHill, an artificial ski slope built on top of a new waste-management center, will be able to go down the rooftop hill for free.
For instance, those who arrive by bike or train at CopenHill, an artificial ski slope built on top of a new waste-management center, will be able to go down the rooftop hill for free. Other sites will allow visitors to volunteer in cleanup efforts. The National Gallery of Denmark will hold workshops to turn plastic waste into pieces of art, while the Copenhagen Surf School will offer a free lunch to surfers who take part in 30 minutes of beach cleaning after their surf course. Explaining the new application, the office said the purpose of CopenPay was “to encourage sustainable behavior and enrich the cultural experience of visitors and residents in Copenhagen by transforming green actions into currency for cultural experiences.” Petersen notes that while the scheme is a “little step towards the green transition,” its impact could be significant: “Imagine if we could have people taking a greener mindset back with them – if that was the souvenir they got – that would be amazing.” Dine for Free in Copenhagen, written by Tor Kjolberg

How I Use TripAdvisor for Booking Tours

TripAdvisor’s site (or app) is a useful tool for finding hotels and restaurants. However, in this article I’ll share with how I use TripAdvisor for booking tours. I use TripAdvisor most for filtering landmarks I want to visit and tours I want to experience. On the site or in the app, you can enter your destination and look for attractions that interest you in that particular location. In order to find the right tour, you have to decide which tours include the landmarks you wish to see. This will take a little time and research, but it pays to know which attractions you would like to visit before committing to a tour. Here is how to use the app to find the attractions that may appeal to you:
How I use TripAdvisor for booking tours
On the TripAdvisor Mobile App, type in the name of the city you will be visiting.
On the TripAdvisor Mobile App. 1. Type in the name of the city you will be visiting. 2. A list of matching cities will pop up. Click on the correct city. 3. Click on “Things to do”. 4. The bottom row will say “Top Attractions” on the left. 5. Click on “See all” on the bottom right. 6. The attractions will appear in order of popularity. 7. If you want to narrow the results, click on “Filter” at the bottom middle of the screen. 8. Click on “Attraction Category” and filter the results with the following options: * Boat Tours & Water Sports * Fun & Games * Nature & Parks * Sights & Landmarks * Food & Drink * Concerts & Shows * Transportation * Shopping * Zoos & Aquariums * Museums * Travel Resources * Outdoor Activities * Spas & Wellness * Events * Classes & Workshops * Water & Amusement Parks * Tours * Nightlife * Casinos & Gambling
How I use TripAdvisor for booking tours
I also read the reviews from other travelers to see if I need to be aware of any pluses or minuses.
On the TripAdvisor website 1. Type the name of the city you will be visiting. 2. A list of matching cities will pop up. Click on the correct city. 3. Click on “things to do”. 4. Click on “Attractions” toward the center of the screen. 5. The attractions will appear in order of popularity. 6. If you wish to narrow the results, notice the “Types of Attractions” on the left side of the screen. 7. Check the appropriate attraction category to filter the results. Once you select a landmark. you can learn more about it. Tourists have uploaded their pictures of each of the landmarks, so I scroll through the pictures of each landmark to determine whether or not I want to visit it. I also read the reviews from other travelers to see if I need to be aware of any pluses or minuses. Sometimes I will decide to pass on a landmark if too many of the reviews indicate there is not much to see.
How I use TripAdvisor for booking tours
Be aware of the duration of the tour.
Landmarks of interest Once I compile a list of the landmarks of interest. I click on the map function on TripAdvisor (on the website this is in the middle of the screen on the right) and group the landmarks by location in case I want to visit them on my own, without a tour. If it costs too much to get transportation between the landmarks, or if I desire a deeper historical context from a guide, I  consider booking a tour that includes as many of the landmarks on my list as possible. Pay special attention to the reviews of the individual tours before choosing one. As always read the one-star reviews first to see if there are any major concerns and use common sense to filter out the complaining morons that plague apps such as TripAdvisor, Expedia, Yelp, and other online platforms. Also, be aware of the duration of the tour. Some tours will pick you up at your hotel, while others will require you to go to a meeting place. Procedures to be aware of Now that you are ready to book a tour, enter your destination on TripAdvisor and click on “Things to Do”. Next, click on “Tours” on the website (“Tours & Sightseeing” on the app). Once you are ready to purchase a tour package, click on the “book” button. The link will take you to Viatour, TripAdvisor’s sister company that specializes in booking tours. From there, you can book in advance with a credit card. Viator will send you a confirmation email with a voucher for the tour. Some tour operators accept a voucher on your phone, while others will require a voucher to be printed out.
How I use TripAdvisor for booking tours
In order to find the right tour, you have to decide which tours include the landmarks you wish to see.
The confirmation email gives you a contact number for the tour company (usually on WhatsApp). You should contact your tour company a few days after booking and a few days before travel to confirm the tour and details such as start time, meeting place or hotel pickup since occasionally discrepancies exist in the information listed in the tour description. If you do not confirm the tour a few days before travel, you run the risk of missing the opportunity to take the tour. This is more common when you are traveling off the beaten path due to internet connectivity issues or simply poor administrative skills on the part of the tour operator. After you take a tour, leave a review on TripAdvisor to help the tour company grow. If you enjoyed the experience, if you had a lackluster or unpleasant experience, leave specific reasons in your review to inform travelers who follow your path. How I use TripAdvisor When Booking a Tour, written by Tor Kjolberg

Norway is Prepping for the ‘Unthinkable’

Last June, the Norwegian Government signed an agreement to start stockpiling grain to prepare for a possible supply problem towards the end of this decade. This way, Norway is prepping for the ‘unthinkable’. Climate change has triggered the Norwegian government to Stockpile 30,000 tons of grains. The Global Seed Vault in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, sometimes known as the “doomsday vault,” serves as a global reserve in the event of natural and man-made disasters. Protecting against potential issues This strategy is designed to protect against potential issues such as rising food prices in events such as a repeat of the COVID-19 pandemic, the spread of wars in Europe, or extreme climate change.
Norway is Prepping for the ‘Unthinkable’
Finance Minister Trygve Slagsvold Vedum
For this year, tons of grain are targeted to be stored by the government. Finance Minister Trygve Slagsvold Vedum, Agriculture and Food Minister Geir Pollestad, and four private firms inked an agreement to store 30,000 tons of grain in 2024 and 2025. The enterprises will store the wheat, which will be owned by the Norwegian government, in facilities that are already in place all around the nation. This year, at least 15,000 tons will be stored by three of the companies. Companies “are free to invest in new facilities and decide for themselves where they want to store the emergency grain, but they must make the grain available to the state if needed,” the government said. ******************************** You might also like to read Do You Know This About Norway? ********************************
Norway is Prepping for the ‘Unthinkable’
Agriculture and Food Minister Geir Pollestad. Photo: regjeringen.no
Preparing for the ‘unthinkable’ Norway’s ministry for agriculture and food said, “the building up of a contingency stock of food grains is about being prepared for the unthinkable.” The finance minister added that there should be an additional level of security in case of major disruptions in international trading systems or failures in domestic production. In the upcoming years, Norway intends to negotiate further stockpiling contracts in order to increase its reserve until 2029. The goal, according to Pollestad, is to store about 82,500 tons of grain by the end of the decade, which would provide the country’s population with enough food to last three months in the event of a disaster, as reported by Norwegian broadcaster NRK. “This is an important part of the government’s work to strengthen national preparedness,” says Slagsvold Vedum. Potential future catastrophes
Norway is Prepping for the ‘Unthinkable’
Tons of grain are targeted to be stored by the government. Photo: Graminor
Potential future catastrophes have been spoken of before by various senior individuals. Regarding pandemics, Microsoft founder Bill Gates warned more could arise over the next few years in a column for The New York Times. On possible upcoming armed conflict, a leaked report from the German Ministry of Defence (Bundeswehr) in January 2023 indicated that a widespread escalation of military action from 2025 was now on the cards, something it said could escalate to all-out conflict by 2028-2029. Norway announced last year that it would restock grain at a cost of 63 million kroner ($6 million) annually. Norway had stored grain in the 1950s but closed down its storage sites in 2003 after deciding they were no longer needed. Source: Nature World News Feature image (on top): USDA-NRCS-Montana-Public-domain

Four Items that can be Recycled after Your Scandinavian Wedding

Your wedding day is one that should focus on you and your partner’s love story – a chance to celebrate and mark this significant milestone in your life together with friends and family. If you don’t want end up with a lot of extra ‘stuff’ that cost money as well as increase environmental footprint, learn about these four items that can be recycled after your Scandinavian wedding. All too often, the romantic notions of the day can get lost in the rush and stress of organising a big occasion, especially if you get caught up in creating a day that follows all the latest trends. As a result, you end up with a lot of extra ‘stuff’ that not only costs money but also creates waste, increasing the environmental footprint of your day. In total contrast, Scandinavian weddings tend to be focused on nature from the start, with an understated elegance and minimalism that results in a relaxed, happy day. Whilst every couple will have different preferences, many people choose to use natural decor, neutral colour palettes and rustic seating, all of which automatically tend to have a smaller carbon impact – especially if they’re not custom-made for the day. But what can you do with the items that you do purchase especially for your Scandinavian wedding? Let’s take a look. ******************************************************** Related: Five Ways to Enjoy a Traditional Scandinavian Wedding ********************************************************

Your outfits

Whilst dress and suit hire options are increasing, most people still prefer to buy their wedding outfits, particularly brides. Unfortunately, whilst suits may get used for other special events, most dresses will only be worn once before being packed away.
Four Items that can be Recycled after Your Scandinavian Wedding
If you have chosen a dress in the minimalist style to match your decor, you have more options to choose from after the big day. Photo: Sentani Boutique
However, if you have chosen a dress in the minimalist style to match your decor, you have more options to choose from after the big day. You could get your dress dyed, to make it more wearable for different occasions, shortened, or even repurposed completely to make a different outfit such as a jumpsuit or top and skirt combination. With 42 million tonnes of plastic waste created in the textiles industry per year, it’s really important to think long-term about what happens to your outfit after the day is over.

Table decorations

Scandi wedding decor is all about pairing sophisticated neutrals such as white, cream, taupe, pale pinks and soft greens, with natural textures such as wood and foliage. Candles and seasonal flowers are often interwoven to plain tablecloths and runners to add a touch of colour without it feeling artificial or too bold. The whole aesthetic is cosy – the bride and groom want their guests to feel relaxed and comfortable.
Four Items that can be Recycled after Your Scandinavian Wedding.
Using raw linen for the table means it can be easily reused.
Fortunately, with a bit of thought, many of these items can be reused or repurposed after the day. For example, candles can be given to guests to take home, or stored up for use on your own. Using raw linen for the table means it can be easily reused, either as a tablecloth or even turned into napkins that you can use for years to come. The key here is to try and use as many natural materials as possible – both for the vibe, but also because the less plastic, the less likely things are to get thrown away. ************************************************** Related: The Ultimate Jaw-Dropping Scandinavian Wedding Destinations **************************************************

Bridal crowns

It’s tradition in many Scandinavian communities for a bridal crown of some sort to be worn. Historically, these would have often been owned by the church and loaned out to brides across the parish for their special day. In modern culture, many people no longer attend church, so this practice has reduced.
Four Items that can be Recycled after Your Scandinavian Wedding
Having some kind of hairpiece, ensures you can use it again.
But, if you do decide to have a bridal crown, you may want to consider commissioning one that can long outlast your love story, and be passed down through the generations. Or, take a nod to this tradition by having some kind of hairpiece, but on a smaller scale, so it can be worn again for different special occasions.

Flowers

Flowers are often a big sustainability offender at weddings, as they’re picked for the day and then discarded. In addition to this, many couples have a set flower in mind, and they aren’t always in season – particularly for weddings that are in spring or early summer, when bad weather can delay the bloom of specific buds. To avoid forcing tropical blooms to grow (and the carbon emissions that go with this), Scandinavian weddings tend to use local blossoms combined with evergreen foliage to create a soft, timeless look. You can encourage your guests to take flowers with them when they leave, to display in their own homes, as well as you taking some for your own. Because they’re seasonal, they should last longer.
Four Items that can be Recycled after Your Scandinavian Wedding
You can use dried flowers in your wedding.
Or, you can even get these flowers dried and pressed, and create a special memento of your day. You could even include some in the envelope with your thank you notes. Whilst your wedding is just one (incredibly special) day, there’s no reason that your decor and outfits need to be one-time use as well. By repurposing, you can do your bit for the planet but also let the day live on for years to come. Four items that can be recycled after your Scandinavian wedding, written dedicatedsly for for Daily Scandinavian.

Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn

The fruit of the common sea buckthorn is a wonderberry, prized for its rich medicinal properties. Read on to learn more about Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn. The fruit is high in polyunsaturated oils and carotene and contains 1.2 times as much vitamin C as oranges; you can almost taste it in the juice, busting with antioxidants.
Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn
In Scandinavia Sea buckthorn grows primarily on dry, windy ground in coasted areas and is tolerant of salt spray from the sea. Photo: Wikipedia
How it grows Common sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ) is found all over Europe and right across Asia as far as China. In Scandinavia it grows primarily on dry, windy ground in coasted areas and is tolerant of salt spray from the sea. It is called tindved in Norwegian and havtorn in Denmark and Sweden. ******************************* You may also like to read: Scandinavian Raspberry ******************************* Sea buckthorn bushes are huge, resembling olive trees, with silvery green leaves and masses of bright orange berries in autumn. The sprays of berry-laden branches are a flower-arranger’s dream. There are male and female plants (the latter bearing the berries) so if you grow sea buckthorn, you will need both to get the berries.
Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn
The easiest,way of harvesting the berries is to cut the berry-laden stems and put them in the freezer. Photo: Solberg & Hansen
Sea buckthorn berries are the most time-consuming and difficult berry to pick: the berries do not drop off willingly and the ripe berries are very soft. The ‘thorn’ in the plant’s name is no joke. The easiest, but rather destructive way of harvesting the berries is to cut the berry-laden stems and put them in the freezer. Once frozen, the berries come tattling off. ***************************** You may also like to read: Cloudberry from Scandinavia *****************************
Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn
With their smooth, golden skin, they look great too. Illustration: Norsk flora
Appearance and taste Health-giving though they are, the best thing about sea buckthorn berries is their astringent but interesting fruity taste. With their smooth, golden skin, they look great too.
Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn
Tindved cake. Photo Dypryst as
Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn
Tindved Date. Photo: appetitt.no
Culinary uses The berries make a lovely, rich, almost tropical tasting jam and cordial, and are even finding their way into baby food. You can make the jam just as you would raspberry jam. You can also use the berries to flavor schnapps by steeping them in the unflavored spirit for a couple of months, then diluting to taste when serving. The berries are very good in cream, and in sauces for fish and venison. Scandinavian Sea Buckthorn, written by Tor Kjolberg