Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills

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Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills

Olav Haraldseid and Winifred Patricia Johansen have written a revealing book on the value of ‘diversity capitalism’ – the value of complementary skills. ‘Though we are different, we are able. It is our differences that when blended move the human race forward’ say the authors. In this book, the Norwegian authors stress the value of complementary skills.

This book should be required reading by all leaders, department managers and HR specialists dealing with different types of personality, attitudes, character traits, skills, and competencies. In this book you can learn how the neurodiverse benefits your company and make it more profitable, which is the reason for the chosen book title ‘Diversity Capitalism’.

Related: First Black Woman Monument in Copenhagen

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
In this book the two authors Olav Haraldseid and Winifred Patricia Johansen describe how the neurodiverse benefits your company and make it more profitable. Photo: Maria Tatsi

Divided in four parts

The book is divided in four parts in which the first is a general introduction to the concept of diversity and inclusion, as something to be sought after, and not simply tolerated. How can the diversity benefit your company and make it more profitable?

The second part discusses the profitability of diversity and explores existing and foundational theories on inclusion, not least exploring the differences between Norway and USA when it comes to successful gender diversity.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
This book is all about diversity and inclusion, as something to be sought after

The third part focuses on invisible diversity and how different diagnosis come with their own sets of challenges.

The last part offers leaders the practical tools to ensure successful and profitable inclusion.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills, read on….

You may also like to read: The Swedish Women’s Lobby

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
The book offers leaders the practical tools to ensure successful and profitable inclusion.

Self-experienced cases

Throughout the book you can learn about the authors’ self-experienced cases, giving the content an in-depth understanding on how diversity capitalism can benefit persons or companies. For instance, as an example of humanity and empathy, when one of the authors, Winifred, was conducting contractual negotiations in London and happened to get stuck in traffic-jam on her way to Heathrow airport. It was a Friday afternoon, and her plane was the last flight to Oslo.

By the time she got to the check-in counter, her seat had already been given to someone else. The plane was full, and the author was completely devastated. Not making that flight meant that she would not be there to make it for her son’s birthday. She had, despite a hectic job never missed important days in her children’s lives. Needless to say, it would not have been easy for her then husband to host twenty-ten years olds for a party in the house without some help. She was so desperate and stressed that she phoned her manager who was on the same flight and asked if he would give up his seat for her. He understood her situation, and being a parent too, he disembarked, and spent the night at the airport so that she would be able to make it home that evening.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
Throughout the book you can learn about the authors’ self-experienced cases. Photo: Maria Tatsi

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills – read on….

Benefitting from diversity rather than suffering from it

Neurodiversity, like Asperger, ADHD, dyslexia, Dyscalculia and dyspraxia are sensitive subjects. So is gender diversity. Many people steer clear of these topics at work altogether rather than risk offending or upsetting colleagues. However, ignoring the issues is not at all the answer. Diversity Capitalism makes the case for benefitting from diversity rather than suffering from it. Olav Haraldseid and Winifred P. Loum Johansen argues that diversity has a greater potential to be profitable for businesses as well as for individuals and is vital for future value creation. Diversity Capitalism is a guide to help managers build and lead diversity. It addresses key issues in diversity management such as recruitment for diversity and points out the obstacles to diversity and inclusion.

Notable Quote:

“Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes…the ones who see things differently – they’re not fond of rules. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they can change things They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.” (Steve Jobs, 1997).

On writing the book

I asked co-author Winifred Johansen what tempted them to write a book on this subject.

“I had serious covid infection in early 2020. While I was in bed, I needed to do something to take my mind away from my misery. I took a deep dive into my doctorate research. I looked at character strengths and failed leadership in relation to long-term crises and started writing about that. Then at some point, I read The Natural Hair Bias in Job Recruitment, research paper by Koval and Rosette on prejudice towards black women with natural hairstyles. Well, as my hair fit the bill of what constitutes bad hair, I started writing a career guidance book with a comical twist entitled “How to build a career with a head full of bad hair!’ (It is on editorial revision).

At some point, Olav and I met, and we shared our book ideas, he was working on a diversity book, and we decided to join forces.”

How did you share the workload when writing the book?

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
At some point, Olav and I met, and we shared our book ideas, he was working on a diversity book, and we decided to join forces,” says Johansen. (From the book cover. Photo: Maria Tatsi

“We both wrote, but from very different perspectives. I was writing an academic piece of work that would benefit MBA students, researchers, and academics, Olav was writing a business book for business leaders. My task was to braid his work and mine, find research to back his statements and experiences, as well as put more of my business experience into my writing (I had written a book void of me!). Content-wise, we ended up on 50-50”.

I did the structuring, referencing, layout, compiling, editing, and liaison with the illustrator, editor, cover designer, etc. (I like the invisible work). Olav is more extrovert, and great on the marketing side of things.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills – About the authors below

You can order the book from Barnes & Noble.

About the authors:

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
Olav Haraldseid

Olav Haraldseid holds a master’s degree in sports psychology from the Norwegian University of physical education and ports specializing in attitudes, motivation and self-confidence. He has been working as a CHRO/HR director in large multinational corporations such as Equinor, Norgesgruppen, Circle K and Apotek 1.

He is a sought-after speaker and runs his own consulting firm specializing in enhancing organizational performance, diversity, developmental assessments and management training.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills
Winifred Patricia Johansen

Winifred Johansen is senior vice president for commercial affairs for Quantafuel ASA and sits on multiple boards in the UK and Norway. Winifred is an engineer, business strategist and lead researcher. With more than two decades of industrial experience (Automotive, Oil and Gas as well as Circular Economy) she has vast experience both in business development and working across cultures.

Winifred holds and M.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Politecnico di Milano, an MBA from the Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen and is currently a doctorate researcher on Transboundary Crisis leadership at the University of Bradford.

Norwegian Authors on the Value of Complementary Skills, written by Tor Kjolberg

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Journalist, PR and marketing consultant Tor Kjolberg has several degrees in marketing management. He started out as a marketing manager in Scandinavian companies and his last engagement before going solo was as director in one of Norway’s largest corporations. Tor realized early on that writing engaging stories was more efficient and far cheaper than paying for ads. He wrote hundreds of articles on products and services offered by the companies he worked for. Thus, he was attuned to the fact that storytelling was his passion.