Wildlife Conservation in Norway

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2010

Wildlife conservation programs are vitally important in the effort to protect species and their habitats. Norwegian wildlife conservation’s surveys bring good news this year for the much prosecuted wolf population of the country and not so good for the shy lynx population. 

Wolves in Norway
Wolves in Norway

This summer nine family groups of lynx have been registered in the wild predator regions of Norway, including Vestfold, Buskerud, Telemark and Aust-Agder.

The Eurasian lynx is a wild cat native to Norway and Sweden as well as large swathes of Eastern Europe and Siberia. Its natural prey includes deer and foxes. This constitutes a reduction of 6.5 family groups compared to last year, according to NRK (Norwegian Broadcasting).

Lynx
Lynx

There are only 30 wolves in Norway—and last year 11,000 people applied to kill half of them.

However Norway’s wolf population has nearly doubled according to another article in the Local published in June. Over the past winter, there were about twice as many Norwegian wolves compared to the year before.

Lynx kitten
Lynx kitten

“This winter, a total of seven litters were registered. Six of them were born in territory that is more than 50 percent within the administrative area for breeding wolves. The Norwegian population target of three annual wolf litters within the zone is therefore reached,” Jonas Kindberg of Rovdata said in a press release.

Jonas Kindberg, Tovdata. Photo: Fredrik Widermo
Jonas Kindberg, Tovdata. Photo: Fredrik Widermo

Rovdata is responsible for operating, communicating and developing the Norwegian Large Predator Monitoring Program. The organization collects, analyzes, and reports monitoring data on the Eurasian lynx, wolverine, brown bear, wolf and golden eagle. It communicates data to the media, the public, key stakeholders and government authorities.

Wildlife Conservation in Norway, written by Admin