Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle

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English Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle

It looks like a golf cart, but has become a workhorse and quite a Norwegian industrial adventure. Royal Mail is now testing the Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle Paxter.

Digitalization and eCommerce have changed the make-up of what is being delivered. The volume of parcels is growing rapidly. The number of small parcels with individual delivery addresses is increasing the most in the delivery mix. Last mile logistics are so complicated that the final leg often accounts for about half the cost of a package’s entire journey.

English Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle
The small Norwegian electric vehicle Paxster EDV for delivery of mail and parcels is now used by a number of companies, including the Norwegian Postal Service.

Related: The Postman Pat Vehicle From Norway

Paxter is produced by Loyd’s factories in Sarpsborg, which originally produced compartments for utility vans for the automotive industry. It produced ompartments for brands such as VW, Toyota and Renault. In 2013 the first version of the Paxter was launched, and so far, more than 3,000 vehicles have been produced.

Time-consuming process
It was time-consuming, not least in the first development phase, to change from a parts supplier to a car manufacturer. A lot of new knowledge was required to develop, test, approve and produce a vehicle, particular in the context of functional electronics.

English Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle
Paxter is produced by Loyd’s factories in Sarpsborg

By 2030, almost 60 per cent of the world’s population will live in urban areas. Traffic congestion, noise and air pollution are pressing problems, calling for safer, greener, more efficient solutions for delivery of post and goods.

Related: Norway: Country of Electric Vehicles

Norwegian Mail’s test lab
Loyd has long been Norwegian Mail’s test lab. For a number of years, the factory has worked to adapt cars, mopeds and bicycles to mail-distribution in harsh environments. Paxster is specifically designed for last-mile distribution of goods – that is, delivery from a transportation hub to a final destination in the home. Produced in Norway, the vehicle can withstand rough road and weather conditions. The small size of the vehicle makes it efficient in traffic and easy to park. Its small environmental footprint makes it an ideal delivery vehicle for cities.

Related: World’s Largest Electric Ferry Now Operational In Norway

English Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle
“It’s really exciting to see these micro electric vehicles making their way into our daily deliveries”, says Simon Thompson, CEO at Royal Mail

Royal Mail committed to reduce environmental impact
Simon Thompson, CEO at Royal Mail, said, “It’s really exciting to see these micro electric vehicles making their way into our daily deliveries. At Royal Mail, we’re committed to keeping on reducing our environmental impact and we intend to leave no stone unturned in trialing new technologies and new ways of delivering to help us do that. As our fantastic posties make most deliveries on foot, this already means we have the lowest reported CO2 per parcel of major UK delivery companies. From drones to electric vehicles, fuel-efficient tires to bio-CNG trucks, we’ll keep on innovating to reduce our environmental impact even further.”

Once the trial period has ended, Royal Mail will make a decision on whether to roll out this category of vehicles more widely across its fleet to complement more conventional vehicles.

Royal Mail is Testing Norwegian Electric Parcel Delivery Vehicle, written by Tor Kjolberg

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Journalist, PR and marketing consultant Tor Kjolberg has several degrees in marketing management. He started out as a marketing manager in Scandinavian companies and his last engagement before going solo was as director in one of Norway’s largest corporations. Tor realized early on that writing engaging stories was more efficient and far cheaper than paying for ads. He wrote hundreds of articles on products and services offered by the companies he worked for. Thus, he was attuned to the fact that storytelling was his passion.